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3:21 PM / Wednesday June 29, 2022

22 Apr 2016

Three charged with crimes in Flint water crisis

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April 22, 2016 Category: Week In Review Posted by:

ABOVE PHOTO:  We stand with Flint! The SUN along with the PA Democratic Black Caucus donated 50 cases of water to Enon’s Heart For Flint Michigan Drive last weekend. Read the article below for latest news in the Flint water crisis in Michigan.

By Mike Householder and Ed White

ASSOCIATED PRESS

FLINT, Mich.– The Flint water crisis became a criminal case Wednesday when two state regulators and a city employee were charged with official misconduct, evidence-tampering and other offenses over the lead contamination that alarmed the country and brought cries of racism.

“This is a road back to restoring faith and confidence in all Michigan families in their government,” Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette said in announcing the charges, months after officials conceded a series of bad decisions caused the disaster.

He warned there will be more charges – “That I can guarantee” – and added: “No one is off the table.”

For nearly 18 months, the poor, mostly black city of 100,000 used the Flint River for tap water as a way to save money – a decision made by a state-appointed emergency manager – while a new pipeline was under construction. But the water wasn’t treated to control corrosion. The result: Lead was released from aging pipes and fixtures as water flowed into homes and businesses.

Gov. Rick Snyder didn’t acknowledge the problem until last fall, when tests revealed high levels of lead in children, in whom the heavy metal can cause low IQs and behavioral problems.

Michael Prysby, a former district engineer with the state Department of Environmental Quality, and Stephen Busch, a supervisor in the department’s drinking water office, were charged with misconduct, conspiracy, tampering with test results and misdemeanor violations of clean-water law. The felonies carry maximum penalties of four to five years in prison.

Flint Water

Ateja Long, (l), sits by her mother Darlene Long and father Charles Long as they talk with Attorney Paul Novak about their situation amidst the water crisis before Flint Water Class Action Team’s community meeting for Flint residents at Dort Federal Credit Union Event Center in Flint, Mich. (Rachel Woolf/The Flint Journal-MLive.com via AP)

Among other things, they were accused of failing to order anticorrosion chemicals added to the water to coat the pipes and prevent them from releasing lead.

Flint utilities administrator Michael Glasgow, who oversaw day-to-day operations at the city’s water plant at the time, also was charged Wednesday with tampering with evidence for allegedly falsifying lead water-testing results and with willful neglect of duty.

Essentially, all three were accused of failing to do their duty to provide safe drinking water.

They could not immediately be reached for comment. Prysby did not return a message. Telephone numbers for the others could not be found. It wasn’t known if they have lawyers.

Busch is on paid leave. Prysby recently took another job at the agency. Glasgow was placed on leave Wednesday.

“They failed Michigan families. Indeed, they failed us all,” Schuette said. “I don’t care where you live.”

The crisis – and state officials’ slow and dismissive response to complaints about the water from experts and Flint residents – led to allegations of environmental racism, emerged as an issue in the presidential race during Michigan’s Democratic primary in March, and sent other cities around the U.S. rushing to test their water, particularly in older neighborhoods that still use lead pipes.

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For months, people in Flint have been relying on filters and bottled water. Some still do not trust what comes out of their taps, even though the city rejoined the Detroit-area water system last fall and anticorrosive phosphates are being added to the water.

The governor filled a few jugs of filtered Flint tap water this week and pledged to drink it for 30 days to show it’s safe.

“It’s a good first step, but it’s a small step,” Flint resident Melissa Mays said of the criminal charges. “These are lower-level people, and I want to know who was instructing them to do what they did. I think it’s important that we can see some form of accountability being laid out, but at the end of the day we still can’t drink or bathe in our water safely.”

Outside experts have also suggested a link between the river and a deadly Legionnaires’ disease outbreak. There were at least 91 cases, including 12 deaths, across Genesee County, which contains Flint, during a 17-month period. That represents a five-fold increase over what the county averaged before.

After the crisis broke open, DEQ Director Dan Wyant and his spokesman resigned. The chief of the department’s drinking water office was fired. And the director of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Chicago-based Midwest office stepped down.

The Flint debacle exposed a problem that extends well beyond the one-time industrial powerhouse.

An Associated Press analysis of EPA data found that nearly 1,400 water systems serving 3.6 million Americans exceeded the federal lead standard at least once between the beginning of 2013 and last September.

Most U.S. cities stopped installing lead pipes in the 1930s to carry water from main lines under the streets and into homes. But a survey by the American Water Works Association found that 6.5 million of these pipes are still in use.

Some researchers question whether chemical treatment and routine testing for lead in the water are enough, arguing that the only way to remove the threat is to replace the pipes. But the cost could easily be hundreds of millions of dollars or more.

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