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4:04 PM / Tuesday September 27, 2022

12 Apr 2018

Three kitchen and bath trends for 2018

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April 12, 2018 Category: Style Posted by:

FAMILY FEATURES

When it’s time for a home remodel, specifically of a bathroom or kitchen, many homeowners turn to trendy looks as inspiration. Color, texture and material variance, like using different types of tile, lead the way in this year’s kitchen and bath trends.

To help amplify the look and appeal of your space, consider these tips from the experts at the National Association of the Remodeling Industry:

Try Different Shades

White is classic, crisp and always in style, while gray also provides a traditional look. Many designers pair white or gray cabinets, tile and wall color with a pop of color to add interest without overwhelming the space. There are many ways to introduce color, such as a bright island or items that are easily switched out like window treatments and artwork.

Combining different shades of white, gray and other neutral colors like beige is an effective way to create a warm and inviting space. One important note to consider when mixing these hues is that they need to be in the same color family. When incorporating white and gray, go for colors that have the same base – either yellow or blue. Mixing a yellow-gray with a blue-white can result in discord that may not “feel” right. A qualified remodeler who has experience in design can provide expert advice and guide the decision-making process to help avoid costly mistakes.

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Consider Various Tile Types

Another popular treatment in kitchens and bathrooms is to use different types of tile and surface stone. Incorporating tile of different shapes and texture such as quartz, marble or granite can energize even the smallest space.

Scale provides another way to create interest. To achieve a mosaic feel, look for 1-by-1-foot tiles prepped on larger 12-by-12-foot sheets. Sometimes these sheets include a pre-defined pattern that can help simplify installation.

Pick Alternate Patterns

Tile options are available in many varieties, so it can be difficult to know where to start. Subway tile, a classic standby, can be invigorated by arranging the rectangular 3-by-6-inch shapes in patterns like herringbone or basket weave. This versatile tile can be used in both traditional kitchens and bathrooms as well as transitional or more contemporary spaces.

Many manufacturers now include textured tile, featuring patterns that carry the look of wood grain; tiles are also available in three-dimensional textures adding movement and interest with easy care. For example, using a variety of gray hues can create a relaxing and warm environment.

Find more trendy tips for home design at NARI.org.

Source: National Association of the Remodeling Industry

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