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11:56 PM / Saturday November 26, 2022

9 Nov 2017

NAACP Set to Change Tax Status to Engage More Politically

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November 9, 2017 Category: Stateside Posted by:

By Lauren Victoria Burke (NNPA Newswire Contributor)

After being eclipsed in recent years by Color of Change, Black Lives Matter and other younger, more tech savvy and politically-pointed groups, the nation’s oldest and largest civil rights organization will change its tax status.

The group’s leaders said that the new tax status would allow them to be more aggressive politically.

During a call with reporters, NAACP officials announced that the civil rights group will transition from a 501(c)(3) to a 501(c)(4) designation. The change will allow the organization to be more partisan and politically focused. However, the tax designation does not allow political work to be the “primary activity” of the organization.

Even though the NAACP is 108 years-old, the organization is struggling to modernize and stay relevant in a rapidly-evolving, social media-driven landscape that requires speed and strategic communications skills.

In October, the NAACP named Derrick Johnson as its president; Johnson was elected by the NAACP’s board to serve for three years.

In a statement announcing Johnson as the new president, Leon Russell, the board chairman of the NAACP said, “As both a longtime member of the NAACP, and a veteran activist in his own right—having worked on the ground to advocate for the victims of Hurricane Katrina, along with championing countless other issues—Derrick also intimately understands the strengths of the Association, our challenges and the many obstacles facing Black Americans of all generations, today. I look forward to continuing to work with him in this new role.”

Russell continued: “In his time serving as our interim president and CEO, Derrick has proven himself as the strong, decisive leader we need to guide us through both our internal transition, as well as a crucial moment in our nation’s history. With new threats to communities of color emerging daily and attacks on our democracy, the NAACP must be more steadfast than ever before.”

Johnson is a native of Detroit, Michigan who lives in Jackson, Mississippi. He is a long-time member of the NAACP, who was elected Vice Chair earlier this year and served as the interim president after Cornell Brooks was forced out. Johnson attended Tougaloo College before earning a juris doctor degree from South Texas College of Law in Houston.

The NAACP ousted Brooks in the spring of this year, a few months before the group’s annual convention in Baltimore.

Lauren Victoria Burke is the White House Correspondent for the NNPA Newswire, author and political analyst. Lauren is a frequent guest of “NewsOne Now” with Roland Martin. Connect with Lauren by email at [email protected] and on Twitter at @LVBurke.

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