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3:02 AM / Tuesday November 29, 2022

3 Mar 2017

Ask Mayor Kenney, Mar 5

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March 3, 2017 Category: Local Posted by:

Dear Mayor Kenney

It seems that the educational landscape is failing so many of Philadelphia’s youth according to high school graduation rates. Are there programs that can help those who want to earn their high school diploma or GED?  I remember Standard Evening High School. Could a venue like that be reinstituted to help those who want high school diplomas, which carry more weight in some quarters? 

Jim M., Lab Technician, East Falls, Age: 60

Hi Jim,

The City’s Office of Adult Education (OAE) is committed to providing educational opportunities and outcomes for all of Philadelphia’s adult learners. In 2014, we developed and launched myPLACE, a centralized adult education system for Philadelphians to find the education programs and services they need. At any of the five myPLACE Campuses citywide, learners can get help from a learning coach, find out their educational skill level and participate in an online self-paced course which helps build their digital literacy skills and awareness for their educational and career needs. From there, the learners are given the opportunity to enroll into programs where they can earn their high school diploma; join a class to improve their reading, writing or math; enroll in an English as a Second Language class; gain basic computer skills; and start their path to a new job or better career.

OAE understands everyone’s busy schedules, so we also offer convenient online courses in reading, writing and math. Adult learners can improve their skills on their own time, anywhere and on any device. One online program that we are piloting is myPREP Online. myPREP is an online self-paced course geared for adult learners preparing for entrance exams that are gateways to training programs, jobs and community colleges.

This past Fall, OAE entered a new partnership with the School District of Philadelphia in the Educational Options Program (EOP) which will benefit learners, 17 years of age and older, who left school before obtaining their high school diplomas. OAE supports the EOP by providing volunteer tutors and mentors, training for additional tutors and mentors, and professional development for the educator practitioners.

And OAE manages the 50 KEYSPOTs citywide. KEYSPOTs are free community-based public computer centers where learners can access the Internet, gain new computer skills, look for jobs, make a resume as well as connect to City services.  These centers are a great resource for any adult learner who needs access to the Internet for their educational programs.

For more information on getting started in adult education classes, call the Office of Adult Education at (215) 686-5250 or visit www.philaliteracy.org.

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