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8:50 AM / Wednesday August 17, 2022

20 Sep 2013

Maintaining masculinity when living with prostate cancer side effects

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September 20, 2013 Category: Health Posted by:

BPT

One out of every six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during his lifetime. The good news is when caught early, it is very treatable. According to
the American Cancer Society, the five-year survival rate for prostate cancer is almost 100 percent because many men receive an early diagnosis.

Although survival rates are high, many prostate cancer patients experience some side effects to treatments of hormone therapy, chemotherapy, radiation
therapy and surgery. These include bowel dysfunction, erectile dysfunction, fertility loss and urinary incontinence, commonly known as bladder leakage.

It is important for men to take an interest in their health and have their prostates checked by a physician to ensure that any abnormalities are properly
diagnosed. Men often don’t want to discuss prostate health or the side effects that sometimes accompany treatment because of social perceptions. The
problem is that a lot of men don’t know how common the side effects, such as bladder leakage, are.

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This causes a stigma often associated with bladder leakage, and the USDA’s National Institutes of Health reports that open communication between a man and
his health care provider about his incontinence is key to maintaining a good quality of life. Men shouldn’t feel like they are compromising their
masculinity by discussing with their doctor any side effects they may be experiencing to their treatments for prostate cancer.

Some men with bladder leakage may refuse to go out in public and avoid social situations for fear of being embarrassed. Many men feel frustrated by and
don’t know how to properly manage this common condition, often relying on ineffective homemade or feminine products because they don’t realize there are
products available just for them.

Men want protection that is made just for them, and new Depend Guards and Shields are discreet products designed to fit a man’s body. Depend Guards offer
maximum absorbency for larger surges, and Depend Shields are ultra-thin with light absorbency for drips and dribbles. These products adhere to the inside
of a man’s underwear so men can be confident in their protection and get back to living an active lifestyle.

Despite experiencing one or more of the side effects to prostate cancer treatment, men should still feel like men while doing the things they love like
watching the game with friends or playing with the kids in the backyard. With the right solutions, men experiencing any of these side effects can still
enjoy an active lifestyle and renewed confidence.

Visit www.GuardYourManhood.com for tips about how to manage bladder leakage.

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