Image

5:00 AM / Saturday July 24, 2021

3 Jun 2017

Access to mental health care may be just a virtual visit away

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
June 3, 2017 Category: Health Posted by:

BPT

Mental health disorders impact thousands of people every day, including many of our friends, neighbors and co-workers. Everyone reading this likely knows someone struggling with mental illness and is aware of the toll it can take on individuals, families and communities. Mental health challenges do not discriminate – they affect people from all walks of life regardless of age, gender, ethnicity and socioeconomic level.

Image

While stress, anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders impact an estimated 43 million adults nationwide each year, the World Health Organization reports that only about one in four people with a diagnosed disorder is likely to pursue treatment.

Unfortunately, barriers prevent people from getting the mental health care they may need. The reasons are many. Consider these statistics: 4,000 areas in the U.S. have only one psychiatrist for 30,000 or more people; the average waiting time for a first psychiatric visit is 25 days; and stigma is the fourth highest-ranked barrier to help-seeking.

The good news is that people who access care more quickly may be more likely to engage in their treatment and have a better outcome. With the right treatment and support, people can recover from mental health disorders to live healthy, self-directed lives as valuable members of their community. Sometimes all it takes is a gentle nudge from a friend or loved one to help someone take that first step on their path to recovery.

For some people, that best first step may be a virtual visit with a mental health provider via a mobile device or computer. For many, access to virtual care may already be available as part of their health care benefits.

Virtual care can shorten wait times for an appointment, fit work and personal schedules, and eliminate travel time and expense. An appointment conducted in the safe, comfortable environment of home may reduce stigma. And, research shows that outcomes of a virtual visit with a mental health provider are similar to in-person sessions for multiple disorders.

Raising awareness and reducing stigma around mental health issues are keys to supporting well-being within our communities. Today, people can access effective, proven treatment in a variety of formats, including using video-calling technology. It’s up to all of us to reach out and encourage our friends, neighbors and family members in need to access these available resources.

For more information and links to recovery support resources in your area, visit www.optum.com/recovery. To learn more about available health care benefits, call the number on the back of your health plan identification card.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Leave a Comment

Recent News

Go With The-Flo

Derek Fisher and former VH1 “Basketball Wives” cast member Gloria Govan got married

July 23, 2021

Tweet Share Pin Email ABOVE PHOTO: Derrick Fisher and Gloria Govan  (Photos: Kathy Hutchins / Shutterstock) By...

Politics

EXPLAINER: Why are Texas Democrats camped out in Washington?

July 23, 2021

Tweet Share Pin Email ABOVE PHOTO: Texas State Rep. Senfronia Thompson, dean of the Texas House of...

Diaspora

French president honors US civil rights leader Jesse Jackson

July 23, 2021

Tweet Share Pin Email ABOVE PHOTO: French President Emmanuel Macron, left, awards Reverend Jesse Jackson with the...

Stateside

Pennsylvania’s overdose deaths rose in 2020, US agency says

July 23, 2021

Tweet Share Pin Email ABOVE PHOTO: A protester holds signs in support of a supervised injection sites...

Food And Beverage

What’s Cookin’? Romaine Lettuce Tacos

July 23, 2021

Tweet Share Pin Email Tweet Share Pin Email Related Posts Tiny Tacos full of nutrition What’s Cookin’?...

Health

NAACP’s ‘COVID. KNOW MORE’ research shows that African Americans must stay vigilant and informed

July 23, 2021

Tweet Share Pin Email BALTIMORE  —  The numbers are indisputable: Over the past year, the coronavirus pandemic...

The Philadelphia Sunday Sun Staff