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9:31 PM / Thursday August 6, 2020

17 Jul 2020

A Millennial Voice: Alive and Living

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July 17, 2020 Category: Commentary Posted by:

I believe that the current state of the world further complicates the already taxing path a person might be on in an effort to find inner peace. 

But  there’s one group that I believe has been footing the bill of pain and agony for centuries, yet is vastly ignored.

That group is Black women. 

Lately I’ve seen people discussing their thoughts on how statements like, “Black women’s lives matter,” and trans lives matter,’ etc., further divide us as a community.  But my counterargument is that if none of these subgroups felt excluded, the need for the isolated grouping would be obsolete. 

As a proud Black woman, it has been difficult and deplorable to see Breonna Taylor’s name turned into memes, viral Tik Tok videos, and simplified for quick consumption and astronomical viewership (ie. retweets, likes, reposting, etc.). Furthermore, I believe her case to be one of the most clear-cut cases that I’ve ever seen in my lifetime, yet little to nothing has been done to make sure that she is brought the justice that she so rightly deserves. Why?

In our effort to prove that all Black Lives Matter, it seems that the Black lives that are treated as an afterthought are the ones that have given birth to this world in its entirety.  

The weight that comes with being a Black woman has never been lost on me. It’s something that you become cognizant of as a child. We’ve given life to the world, to our community, to our history, but when it comes to our wellbeing, I’ve found in general that we are severely under protected and underserved. We are expected to be strong for everyone.

Yet, who is strong for us? 

Lately, as a means to afford myself a bit of peace, I’ve been finding ways to solidify and concretize the reason for my being, learning new ways to revel in my Black womanhood, in addition to  revisiting and revising exactly what that means to me. I wanted to create a list of things I’ve been doing to keep sane for the Black women who are also in search of peace amidst the chaos. 

1. Meditation/Prayer: Though I have much further to go, I am extremely spiritual. I’ve been listening to and attending sound baths, practicing my posture, and working on deep breathing and clearing my mind. (Always in a candle lit/incensed room).

2. Music: Music and dancing are my safe haven. For me, the ability to move my body to the melodic Black voices that penetrate my speakers have connected me to myself, my history, and my past. Black joy is resistance, and sometimes the easiest thing for me to do in moments of despair is to dance, no matter how bad I am at it. 

3. Reading: I love the way reading makes me feel — so knowledgeable and mentally stimulated. I’ve taken to reading more about Black history and stories from Black authors and abolitionists, which in turn has taught me so much.

4. Doing Nothing: As aforesaid, the burden or strength tends to fall on the Black woman, so much so that we’re conditioned to do too much in too short a span of time. Everything we’re experiencing right now — all the information we’re constantly receiving — is quite draining at times, so I highly recommend unplugging when you can. I’m learning how to be at peace with saying “no” to things that do not feel in alignment with my higher being and I feel that I’ve been rewarded for it. 

5. Creating: Creating has been a great way for me to express myself through art in a way that’s sacred to me. Fueling my energy, whatever it may be that day, into something beautiful that I’m proud of is gratifying. 

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6. Fill your house with plants: For me, plants symbolize resilience, especially because I’ve accidentally killed and revived many. The ability to take care of something that benefits your health, your home, and our planet feels so good! To care for another living thing that wants and needs nothing but your care and sunlight? I think we can all take some notes from our green brothers and sisters.

7. Holding on to any and everything that makes you smile. 

The state of the world is “changing” and it’s important that we continue or start to do whatever we can for ourselves and for our sanity. I hope you find this list helpful. 

Disclaimer: The views, thoughts, and opinions expressed in the article belong solely to the author, and not necessarily to the author’s employer, The Philadelphia Sunday SUN, the author’s organization, committee or other group or individual.

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